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When the Navy Took to the Air Philip Macdougall

When the Navy Took to the Air By Philip Macdougall

When the Navy Took to the Air by Philip Macdougall


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New RRP £18.99
Condition - Very Good
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Summary

The untold story of the Royal Navy's experimental flying stations created in the First World War to perfect the aeroplane as a weapon of war. In establishing a number of advanced experimental units, the envelope of flight was pushed to the extreme, resulting in futuristic weapons, advanced aircraft and new approaches to gaining aerial victory.

When the Navy Took to the Air Summary

When the Navy Took to the Air: The Experimental Seaplane Stations of the Royal Naval Air Service by Philip Macdougall

Up to and during the First World War, the Royal Navy was at the forefront of developments in aviation: concerned not just with the use of military aircraft to defend the fleet, but also securing the homeland against Zeppelin raiders and undertaking tactical air strikes into enemy territory. With the aeroplane a totally new and revolutionary weapon, the work of several experimental airfields and seaplane stations became crucial to the success of these operations. Taking the lead role were Felixstowe and the Isle of Grain, where work on the development of new aircraft and aerial weapons was handled, alongside ground-breaking advances in navigational systems, air-to-ground radio communication, and deck-board ship landings. These two air stations (as well as others with a more minor role) witnessed a huge scale of expenditure and the assembly of an elite group of experts and hotshot pilots who, in pushing the envelope to the extreme, sometimes sacrificed their own lives. The work of these experimental stations has been more or less forgotten, a result of the Royal Naval Air Service having been subsumed into the Royal Air Force, and the subsequent emphasis on the aeroplane as a weapon of land warfare. In this First World War anniversary period, it is a story that needs telling.

About Philip Macdougall

Philip Macdougall is a graduate of the University of Lancaster and a former lecturer at the University of Kent. He has written extensively on the subject of military aviation and is the author of the Fonthill title: 'Air Wars, 1920-1939: The Development and Evolution of Fighter Tactics'. He has a particular interest in naval aviation having lived on the Isle of Grain, the site of the nation's most important experimental air station until its closure in 1924.

Additional information

GOR013574861
9781781555729
1781555729
When the Navy Took to the Air: The Experimental Seaplane Stations of the Royal Naval Air Service by Philip Macdougall
Used - Very Good
Paperback
Fonthill Media Ltd
2017-05-11
176
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us

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