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An Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice Filippo Dionigi

An Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice By Filippo Dionigi

An Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice by Filippo Dionigi


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Summary

Rawls' 1971 text links the idea of social justice to a basic sense of fairness that recognizes human rights and freedoms.

An Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice Summary

An Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice by Filippo Dionigi

John Rawls's A Theory of Justice is one of the most influential works of legal and political theory published since the Second World War. It provides a memorably well-constructed and sustained argument in favour of a new (social contract) version of the meaning of social justice. In setting out this argument, Rawls aims to construct a viable, systematic doctrine designed to ensure that the process of maximizing good is both conscious and coherent - and the result is a work that foregrounds the critical thinking skill of reasoning. Rawls's focus falls equally on discussions of the failings of existing systems - not least among them Marxism and Utilitarianism - and on explanation of his own new theory of justice. By illustrating how he arrived at his conclusions, and by clearly explaining and justifying his own liberal, pluralist values, Rawls is able to produce a well structured argument that is fully focused on the need to persuade.

Rawls explicitly explains his goals. He discusses other ways of conceptualizing a just society and deals with counter-arguments by explaining his objections to them. Then, carefully and methodically, he defines a number of concepts and tools-thought experiments-that help the reader to follow his reasoning and test his ideas. Rawls's hypothesis is that his ideas about justice can be universally applied: they can be accepted as rational in any society at any time.

About Filippo Dionigi

Dr Filippo Dionigi holds a PhD from LSE, where he is currently a Leverhulm Early Career Fellow in International Relations. He is the author of Hezbollah, Islamist Politics and International Society (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014).

Dr Jeremy Kleidosty received his PhD in international relations from the University of St Andrews. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Jvaskyla, and is the author of The Concert of Civilizations: The Common Roots of Western and Islamic Constitutionalism.

Table of Contents

Ways in to the Text Who was John Rawls? What does Theory of Justice Say? Why does Theory of Justice Matter? Section 1: Influences Module 1: The Author and the Historical Context Module 2: Academic Context Module 3: The Problem Module 4: The Author's Contribution Section 2: Ideas Module 5: Main Ideas Module 6: Secondary Ideas Module 7: Achievement Module 8: Place in the Author's Work Section 3: Impact Module 9: The First Responses Module 10: The Evolving Debate Module 11: Impact and Influence Today Module 12: Where Next? Glossary of Terms People Mentioned in the Text Works Cited

Additional information

NGR9781912127849
9781912127849
1912127849
An Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice by Filippo Dionigi
New
Paperback
Macat International Limited
2017-07-15
96
N/A
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