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Islam and English Law Robin Griffith-Jones

Islam and English Law By Robin Griffith-Jones

Islam and English Law by Robin Griffith-Jones


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Condition - Very Good
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Summary

This volume discusses Rowan Williams' lecture on shari'a law, which launched an interdisciplinary media debate on the relationship between Islam and Christianity, as well as church and state. Of considerable interest to students of law, religion, Islamic history and those interested in the ongoing debate about shari'a law.

Islam and English Law Summary

Islam and English Law: Rights, Responsibilities and the Place of Shari'a by Robin Griffith-Jones

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams triggered a storm of protest when he suggested that some accommodation between British law and Islam's shari'a law was 'inevitable'. His foundational lecture introduced a series of public discussions on Islam and English Law at the Royal Courts of Justice and the Temple Church in London. This volume combines developed versions of these discussions with new contributions. Theologians, lawyers and sociologists look back on developments since the Archbishop spoke and forwards along trajectories opened by the historic lecture. The contributors provide and advocate a forward-looking dialogue, asking how the rights of all citizens are honoured and their responsibilities met. Twenty specialists explore the evolution of English law, the implications of Islam, shari'a and jihad and the principles of the European Convention on Human Rights, family law and freedom of speech. This book is for anyone interested in the interaction between religion and secular society.

Islam and English Law Reviews

'The contributions collected in [this book] testify [to] the extent and the complexity of the matter.' The Bookseller
'... casts light on urgent global issues and forces readers to confront stereotypes about sharia.' Caroline Binham, Financial Times
'[Rowan Williams' February 2008 lecture, 'Civil and Religious Law in England'] formed part of a series marking the 400th anniversary of the entrusting of the Temple Church (established hundreds of years earlier by the Knights Templar) to the care of the Middle and Inner Temple; and so the interplay between religion and law in general, and of Islam and English law in particular, was a fitting focus. This extremely valuable collection of essays is based on that lecture series, and also includes other 'conversations' between authors on other issues, including responses to the publication of Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, and the cartoons in the Danish daily newspaper Jyllands-Posten, and contemporary understandings of jihad.' Malcolm D. Evans, Church Times

About Robin Griffith-Jones

Robin Griffith-Jones is Master of the Temple at the Temple Church and Senior Lecturer in Theology, King's College London. He is author of The Four Witnesses (2000), The Gospel According to Paul (2004) and Mary Magdalene (2008). He initiated and managed the series of public discussions at the Temple Church, Islam and English Law, that was launched with the Archbishop of Canterbury's historic lecture on shari'a law.

Table of Contents

List of contributors; Preface Robin Griffith-Jones; List of abbreviations; Introduction Stephen Hockman; Part I. The Archbishop of Canterbury and Shari'a Law: 1. The 'unavoidable' adoption of shari'a law? The generation of a media storm Robin Griffith-Jones; 2. Civil and religious law in England: a religious perspective Rowan Williams; Part II. The Archbishop's Proposal for 'Transformative Accommodation': Section 1. Shari'a and Secular Democracy: Is Islamic Law Compatible with the European Convention on Human Rights?: 3. The Refah case at the European Court of Human Rights Nicolas Bratza; 4. The compatibility of an Islamic/shari'a law system or shari'a rules with the European Convention on Human Rights Dominic McGoldrick; 5. An analysis of the relationship between shari'a and secular democracy and the compatibility of Islamic law with the European Convention on Human Rights Mashood A. Baderin; 6. Dignity and religion Christopher McCrudden; Section 2. Legal Pluralism: Should English Law Give Greater Recognition to Islamic Law?: 7. Family law: current conflicts and their resolution Elizabeth Butler-Sloss and Mark Hill; 8. Arbitration law and family law: developments towards legal pluralism? Ian Edge; 9. Judging Muslims Prakash Shah; 10. From Muslim migrants to Muslim citizens Shaheen Sardar-Ali; 11. Ontario's 'shari'a court': law and politics intertwined Marion Boyd; Section 3. Accommodation or Conflict: Trajectories in the United Kingdom: 12. Religious rights and the public interest Robin Griffith-Jones; Part III. Responsibilities and Rights: Section 4. Freedom of Speech, Incitement to Religious Hatred: Beyond the Divide?: 13. Where to draw the line, and how to draw it Sydney Kentridge, including a note: the Satanic Verses and the Danish cartoons Robin Griffith-Jones; 14. Censor or censure: maintaining civility Tariq Modood; 15. In praise of 'fuzzy law' Albie Sachs; Section 5. Defining Jihad: Personal Commitment, Politics and the State: 16. Towards an Islamic society, not an Islamic state Abdullahi An-Na'im; 17. Following shari'a in the West Tariq Ramadan; 18. Violence, personal commitment and democracy Khaled Abou El Fadl; Part IV. Prospect: Equality before God and before the Law: 19. Equal before God David F. Ford; 20. Equal before the law Nicholas Phillips.

Additional information

GOR005022116
9781107639874
1107639875
Islam and English Law: Rights, Responsibilities and the Place of Shari'a by Robin Griffith-Jones
Used - Very Good
Paperback
Cambridge University Press
2013-04-11
331
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us

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