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Barber Shop Chronicles Inua Ellams

Barber Shop Chronicles By Inua Ellams

Barber Shop Chronicles by Inua Ellams


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Barber Shop Chronicles Summary

Barber Shop Chronicles by Inua Ellams

Newsroom, political platform, local hot spot, confession box, preacher-pulpit and football stadium. For generations, African men have gathered in barber shops to discuss the world. These are places where the banter can be barbed and the truth is always telling. Barber Shop Chronicles, which was partly inspired by verbatim recordings, is a heart-warming, hilarious and insightful play that leaps from a barber shop in Peckham to Johannesburg, Harare, Kampala, Lagos and Accra over the course of a single day. It was first produced by the National Theatre, Fuel and Leeds Playhouse in 2017 and is here publishedas a Methuen Drama Student Edition with commentary and notes by Oladipo Agboluaje.

Barber Shop Chronicles Reviews

Isn't this what all playwrights would wish for? To come across in their daily lives a dramatic arena. To find it both immediate and far-reaching. To put on stage lives that have not been seen there before ... [The] chronicles are set in Lagos, Johannesburg, Harare, Accra, Kampala - and south London. They include confessionals, politics, feuding, tales of men away from their homes, men cut off from fathers, men in search of companionship. Common threads - a plot about father and son, a joke about a fly in a drink, a big Barcelona-Chelsea match - weave these episodes together. But it is the stretch of the talk and material that is remarkable: anecdotal and argumentative. -- Susannah Clapp * Observer *
Throbs with energy and heat. Full of sadness and great joy. * Daily Telegraph *
Rich and exhilarating. A fascinating peek into the barber shop. * The Stage *
Life-affirming * Independent *

About Inua Ellams

Inua Ellams was born in Nigeria and is an internationally touring poet, playwright, performer, graphic artist and designer. He is an ambassador for the Ministry of Stories and has published four books of poetry: Candy Coated Unicorns and Converse All Stars, Thirteen Fairy Negro Tales, The Wire-Headed Heathen and #Afterhours. His first play, The 14th Tale, was awarded a Fringe First at the Edinburgh International Theatre Festival and his fourth play, Barber Shop Chronicles, sold out its run at the National Theatre. He is currently touring An Evening With An Immigrant and working on The Half God of Rainfall - a new play in verse. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Oladipo 'Dipo' Agboluaje is a British-Nigerian playwright and academic, born in Hackney and educated in Britain and Nigeria. He studied Theatre Arts at the University of Benin, Nigeria, and later wrote a doctoral thesis at the Open University, UK, on West and South African drama. He won the Alfred Fagon prize for playwriting for his play Iya-lle and is a Fellow of the Royal Literary Fund, working in partnership with the University of East London, UK.

Table of Contents

CHRONOLOGY COMMENTARY PLAYWRIGHT CONTEXT Black British drama (including work of practitioners such as Roy Williams, debbie tucker green and Mojisola Adebayo) THEMES Masculinity (including sport and sexuality) and how it shapes characters and subverts universal and specifically black and African notions of masculinity GENRE Verbatim theatre (use of transcripts to create a work of fiction); comparing to other verbatim plays such as London Road and The Permanent Way SETTING Barbershop as a 'safe space' for black men Diasporic movements - how the play's transnational locations construct a 'black' identity PLAY TEXT FURTHER READING

Additional information

NGR9781350200142
9781350200142
135020014X
Barber Shop Chronicles by Inua Ellams
New
Paperback
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
20210909
136
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
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