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Capacity Planning for Web Performance Daniel A. Menasce

Capacity Planning for Web Performance By Daniel A. Menasce

Capacity Planning for Web Performance by Daniel A. Menasce


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Summary

Discusses the problem of Capacity Planning and Performance Analysis in Web Server, Intranet and Client/Server environments. This book identifies problem areas where capacity planning and performance analysis are critical concerns: arrival rate, through-put, response time, service demand, workload, delay, bottleneck, and saturation.

Capacity Planning for Web Performance Summary

Capacity Planning for Web Performance: Metrics, Models, and Methods by Daniel A. Menasce

This book will discuss the problem of Capacity Planning and Performance Analysis in Web Server, Inranet and Client/Server environments. It will identify problem areas where capacity planning and performance analysis are critical concerns: arrival rate, through-put, response time, service demand, workload, delay, bottleneck, and saturation. It will discuss protocol (HTTP & TCP/IP) and workloads (access to HTML documents, graphics, etc.). It will show how to access existing capacities and how to plan for future capacities. It will discuss benchmarking metrics, global systems problems, workload forecasting, etc.

Capacity Planning for Web Performance Reviews

Reader Reviews From: Peter J. Denning Many have said that the Web is too amorphous and chaotic to permit meaningful performance forecasts. Almeida and Menasce demolish this myth. Throughput, response time, and congestion can be measured and predicted, all using familiar tools from queuing networks that you can run on your own computer. There is no other book like this. It is a first. Quote by Leonard Kleinrock, Professor of Computer Science, UCLA This is a welcome approach to the performance analysis of todays web-based Internet. It is a useful and practical treatment that is eminently accessible to the non-mathematical professional. An impressive feature the authors provide is to deal directly with the fractal nature of web-based traffic; no simple and practical treatment has been offered before, and theirs is a timely contribution. From: Jim Gray, Senior Researcher, Microsoft Research This excellent book gives a quantitative and pragmatic approach to measuring, analyzing, and understanding web servers. It presents a good tutorial on the performance issues of web servers, and presents the analytic tools needed to model them. Web servers have bursty and highly-skewed load characteristics. This book presents a new way to model, analyze, and plan for these new performance problems. The book is a valuable resource for students and for web-administrators. From: Jeffrey P. Buzen, Chief Scientist and CoFounder BGS Systems This book takes the mystery out of analyzing Web performance. The authors have skillfully culled through more than a DELETE twenty-five years of performance related research, and have selected the results that are most critical to Web performance. They have also developed important new material that deals directly with the special properties of applications that run on the Web. With everything together in a single volume, Menasce and Almeida have created a superb starting point for anyone wishing to explore the world of Web performance.

About Daniel A. Menasce

DANIEL A. MENASCE is a Professor of Computer Science at George Mason University, VA. He has published extensively in the area of performance modeling, client/system performance evaluation, and software performance engineering. Menasce was elected a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in recognition of outstanding contributions to information technology. VIRGILIO A. F. ALMEIDA is a Professor of Computer Science at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil. He has published extensively in the area of distributed systems and World Wide Web performance. Almeida held visiting faculty and research positions at Boston University and XEROX PARC.

Table of Contents



Preface.


Theme and Approach.


Who Should Read this Book.


Book Organization.


Acknowledgments.


Book's Web Site and Authors' Addresses.


1. When Performance Is a Problem.

Introduction.

Client/Server Performance.

The Capacity Planning Concept.

Web Server Performance.

Intranet Performance.

Internet Service Provider (ISP) Performance.

Summary.

Bibliography.



2. What Are Client/Server Systems?

Introduction.

The World of Networks.

Genesis.

Types of Networks.

Wide Area Networks (WANs).

Local Area Networks (LANs).

The LAN to WAN Connection.

The Home to WAN Connection.

Protocols.

Internet Protocol.

Transmission Control Protocol.

The World of Clients and Servers.

The Client/Server Paradigm.

Server Types.

Architectural Issues.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



3. Performance Issues in Client/Server Environments.

Introduction.

Communication-Processing Delay Diagrams.

Service Times and Service Demands.

Service Times at Single Disks and Disk Arrays.

Single Disks.

Disk Arrays.

@AHEADS = Service Times in Networks.

@AHEADS = Service Times at Routers.

Queues and Contention.

Some Basic Performance Results.

Utilization Law.

Forced Flow Law.

Service Demand Law.

Little's Law.

Summary of Basic Results.

Performance Metrics in C/S Systems.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



4. Web Server and Intranet Performance Issues.

Introduction.

More than Just Servers.

HTML.

The Combination of HTTP and TCP/IP.

Hardware and Operating System.

Contents.

Where Are the Delays?

Anatomy of a Web Transaction.

Bottlenecks.

Perception of Performance.

Metrics.

Quality of Service.

Infrastructure.

Basic Components.

Proxy, Cache, and Mirror.

Web Server.

Architecture.

Workload.

Dynamic Web Pages.

Novel Features.

Intranet and the Internet.

Bandwidth and Latency.

Traffic.

Capacity Planning.

Summary.

Bibliography.



5. A Step-by-Step Approach to Capacity Planning in Client/Server Systems.

Introduction.

Adequate Capacity.

A Methodology for Capacity Planning in C/S Environments.

Understanding the Environment.

Workload Characterization.

Breaking Down the Global Workload.

Data Collection Issues.

Validating Workload Models.

Workload Forecasting.

Performance Modeling and Prediction.

Performance Models.

Performance Prediction Techniques.

Performance Model Validation.

Development of a Cost Model.

Cost/Performance Analysis.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



6. Understanding and Characterizing the Workload.

Introduction.

Characterizing the Workload for an Intranet.

First Approach.

A Simple Example.

Workload Model.

Workload Characterization Methodology.

Choice of an Analysis Standpoint.

Identification of the Basic Component.

Choice of the Characterizing Parameter.

Data Collection.

Partitioning the Workload.

Resource Usage.

Applications.

Objects.

Geographical Orientation.

Functions.

Organizational Unit.

Model.

Calculating Class Parameters.

Averaging.

Clustering.

paragraphData Analysis.

paragraphDistance Measures.

paragraphScaling Techniques.

paragraphClustering Algorithms.

Bursty Workloads.

Conclusions.

Bibliography.



7. Using Standard Industry Benchmarks.

Introduction.

The Nature of Benchmarks.

Benchmark Hierarchy.

Avoiding Pitfalls.

Common Benchmarks.

Component-Level Benchmarks.

CPU.

Workload.

Results.

File Server.

Laddis.

Workload.

Results.

System-Level Benchmarks.

Transaction Processing Systems.

TPC-C.

paragraphWorkload.

paragraphResults.

Web Servers.

Webstone.

paragraphWorkload.

paragraphResults.

SPECWeb.

paragraphWorkload.

paragraphResults.

Conclusions.

Bibliography.



8. System-Level Performance Models.

Introduction.

Simple Server Model I-Infinite Population/Infinite Queue.

Simple Server Model II-Infinite Population/Finite Queue.

Generalized System-Level Models.

Other System-Level Models.

Infinite Population Models.

Variable Service Rate and Infinite Queue.

Variable Service Rate and Limited Queue Size.

Finite Population Models.

Fixed Service Rate.

Variable Service Rate.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



9. Component-Level Performance Models.

Introduction

Queuing Networks

Open Systems.

Single-Class Open Queuing Networks.

Multiple-Class Open Queuing Networks.

Closed Models.

Single-Class Closed Models.

Bounds for Closed QNs.

Multiple-Class Closed Models.

Modeling Multiprocessors.

An Intranet Model.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



10. Web Performance Modeling.

Introduction.

Incorporating New Phenomena.

Burstiness Modeling.

Defining a Burstiness Factor.

Adjusting Service Demands to Burstiness.

Accounting for Heavy Tails in the Model.

Client-Side Models.

No Cache Proxy Server Case.

The Performance Model.

Computing Service Demands.

Using a Cache Proxy Server.

Server-Side Models.

Single Web Server.

The Performance Model.

Computing Service Demands.

Mirrored Web Servers.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



11. Workload Forecasting.

Introduction.

Forecasting Strategy.

From Business Processes to Workload Parameters.

Forecasting Techniques.

Regression Methods.

Moving Average.

Exponential Smoothing.

Applying Forecasting Techniques.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



12. Measuring Performance.

Introduction.

Performance Measurement Framework.

Measurement Techniques.

Event Mode.

Sampling Mode.

Data Collection Tools.

Hardware Monitor.

Software Monitor.

Accounting Systems.

Program Analyzers.

Logs.

Performance Model Parameters.

Queues.

Workload Classes.

Workload Intensity.

Service Demands.

Parameter Estimation.

Collecting Performance Data.

Network.

Server.

Windows NT283.

UNIX286.

Concluding Remarks.

Bibliography.



13. Wrapping Up.

Bibliography.



A Glossary of Terms.


About the CD-ROM309.


The Workbooks.


HTTP Log Sample and Program.


Subject Index.

Additional information

GOR002840715
9780136938224
0136938221
Capacity Planning for Web Performance: Metrics, Models, and Methods by Daniel A. Menasce
Used - Very Good
Paperback
Pearson Education (US)
19980706
336
N/A
Book picture is for illustrative purposes only, actual binding, cover or edition may vary.
This is a used book - there is no escaping the fact it has been read by someone else and it will show signs of wear and previous use. Overall we expect it to be in very good condition, but if you are not entirely satisfied please get in touch with us

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